User not logged in - login - register
Home Calendar Books School Tool Photo Gallery Message Boards Users Statistics Advertise Site Info
go to bottom | |
 Message Boards » » ANYTHING CAMPING/BACKPACKING Page 1 ... 36 37 38 39 [40], Prev  
PaulISdead
All American
5910 Posts
user info
edit post

Any experience with rei sleeping bags or backpacking packs?

4/15/2016 7:41:28 PM

neodata686
All American
11411 Posts
user info
edit post

https://gearjunkie.com/osprey-atmos-ag-backpack

Picked up one of these for $170 during the REI sale this weekend. It's super comfortable. My 36L Osprey is a little small for 4+ night trips and my old 60L has a flat back and this thing is super comfortable. I like not having a sweaty back after backpacking.

^REI makes solid gear. I would say as far as comfort their backpacks are a slight step down from like Osprey or Gregory but for the price they're awesome. Also the sleeping bags may be slightly heavier than other alternatives but again great for the price. If you're super worried about weight and can spend a little extra then you might not want to go with REI brand stuff but otherwise the stuff is quality. Either way you have a year to try it out. If you're not satisfied return it!

5/23/2016 12:50:45 PM

MeatStick
All American
1165 Posts
user info
edit post

I've had an REI sleeping bag for 3 years now. It's one of the Halo downfill ones. It's awesome. A Little heavy, but I also got a really full down bag. It's been really touch, and has little pockets and extras that really add up.

5/26/2016 4:02:59 PM

darkone
(\/) (;,,,;) (\/)
10631 Posts
user info
edit post

Use that DEET, folks. My office mate just got Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

5/26/2016 6:32:51 PM

neodata686
All American
11411 Posts
user info
edit post

Just got back from 4 nights 5 days in Glacier National Park! Will post some pics when I get around to editing them. We did run into a massive grizzly on the trail not 30 yards from where we took a water break. Luckily 7 guys making noise was enough to scare him off into the woods.

8/22/2016 6:30:15 PM

neodata686
All American
11411 Posts
user info
edit post

So going on our first winter (well technically still fall) backpacking trip next weekend in Colorado. Weather is ~20 high and ~3 low. I've done a decent amount of backpacking in the winter out east but this is my first time out here.

I think I've covered all the bases (big differences from 3-season backpacking):

1. Boiling water from snow and using chlorine (filters will freeze).
2. Insulated nalgenes (I've got these https://www.rei.com/product/110065/outdoor-research-water-bottle-parka-32-fl-oz).
3. Snowshoes, spikes, insulated boots, poles.
4. Avy gear (beacon, probe, shovel - have this already from back country skiing). No risk in the area we're going but I like getting used to always carrying it.
5. Base/mid/outer layers.
6. Gloves, hat, balaclava, ski goggles.
7. Going to try and hammock camp as pitching a tent in the snow isn't always fun. I've got a zero degree under-quilt but I'll be doubling up and bringing another zero degree bag plus a pad (usually not needed with the under-quilt but can't hurt to be over prepared).

We're not planning on hiking a long distance the first time and our first night will only be a few miles from our truck. Depending on the snow pack we may try and build an igloo.

I've done some hut trips before in the winter (both snowshoeing and skiing) so I'm not really concerned with the daily activities more so with camp related stuff.

Any tips?

12/2/2016 12:34:06 PM

maxxxpower
New Recruit
18 Posts
user info
edit post

thinking about buying an ENO hammock from REI this weekend. I've started noticing anyone I know who really knows camping is using hammocks now -- more flexible for weather etc...

What's y'all's take on ENO?

Overpriced?

Overrated?

Knock offs are just as good?

Or God's perfect gift to camping?

12/15/2016 3:05:15 PM

neodata686
All American
11411 Posts
user info
edit post

I have both. Don't get an Eno for camping/sleeping. Get an Eno if you want to hang out and read a book on a warm day. The hammock community doesn't really camp in Enos.

If you buy everything you need for camping with an Eno (underquilt/pad, bug net, rain fly etc) it's usually more expensive and much heavier than alternatives.

A good Hammock starter kit is something from Hennessy:

https://hennessyhammock.com/collections/hammocks

I have the Ultralite Backpacker. It's 1 lbs 15oz for the hammock, bug net, and rain fly. All you really need after that is an underquilt or pad then an overquilt or a sleeping bag.

You can go lighter with the Hyperlite but I found the material too thin.

REI has Hennessy Hammocks usually in store. They're great to mod as well (e.g. https://whoopieslings.com/).

I upgraded the included rain fly with a Hex rainfly (https://hennessyhammock.com/products/hex-rainfly-70d-polyester) and it's huge. I use my trekking poles to lift the front like a front porch and it's plenty big enough for multiple people to hang out beneath if it's raining:



I have an under/over quilt from this guy:

http://www.hammockgear.com/down-quilts/

Then a suspension kit from here:

http://www.dutchwaregear.com/dutch-buckle-suspension-kit.html

Set up is a breeze with the whoopie slings and the dutch clips/buckles.

12/15/2016 3:34:02 PM

maxxxpower
New Recruit
18 Posts
user info
edit post

Neo, wow, thanks...invaluable info.

One last Question if I can: is there anything about an under quilt that can't be replaced with a few wool blankets? Like is it some structural design that offers the advantage over just a sleeping bag?

12/15/2016 3:48:39 PM

neodata686
All American
11411 Posts
user info
edit post

Quote :
"One last Question if I can: is there anything about an under quilt that can't be replaced with a few wool blankets? Like is it some structural design that offers the advantage over just a sleeping bag?"


Great question. For camping under ~60F you're going to want either a pad or an underquilt. A wool blanket might work as well because compressing it doesn't inhibit its insulating properties. I really only backpack when I hammock camp so bringing wool isn't really an option because of how heavy it is.

A sleeping bag acts on the principles of loft and heat is retained when the down has the ability to spread out. The minute you're on top of a down sleeping bag you're eliminating it's insulating properties. That's one reason why you use a pad when tent camping (for insulation). If you've ever tried sleeping on the ground (ignoring it being hard) with only a sleeping bag you realize you lose A LOT of heat through the ground.

With hammock camping if you only use a sleeping bag you'll very quickly get super cold because you're compressing the down you're on top of. A pad works great but it slides around and isn't the most comfortable to use. Plus any part of your body that isn't touching the pad and is touching the sides of the hammock (like your elbows or shoulders) is going to be super cold.

The advantage of a down underquilt is it creates (for lack of a better term) a womb around the hammock and you're warm all over. Then all you need is a light blanket or overquilt (essentially half a sleeping bag) to keep cold air from hitting you from the top (where the underquilt doesn't cover).

Good illustration of an underquilt:



There's also a lot of good information here:

https://hammockforums.net/forum/forum.php

and here:

http://theultimatehang.com/hammock-camping-101/

Also this guy is hilarious:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC27nqmEhKzD9YHK1IFwG7qA

He frequents Linville Gorge in North Carolina and his videos are spectacular.

He also hammock camps in Minnesota in -40 degree weather:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTuGJgka1qc

I just did a backpacking trip in Colorado in 3 feet of snow and I was super warm in the single digits at night. The under quilt essentially acts as a heater and it's so much warmer than a tent.

[Edited on December 15, 2016 at 4:19 PM. Reason : s]

12/15/2016 4:05:06 PM

dtownral
All American
19498 Posts
user info
edit post

When do the REI 20% off coupons come out?

2/25/2017 5:45:17 PM

neodata686
All American
11411 Posts
user info
edit post

With your dividend in 2-3 weeks I think.

2/26/2017 11:28:34 AM

PaulISdead
All American
5910 Posts
user info
edit post

All the marketing words aside. Hammock camping may be advantageous in situations where it's hot, there exist plenty of trees, are no bugs. Please let me know when you find this location.

[Edited on February 26, 2017 at 5:20 PM. Reason : .]

2/26/2017 5:19:48 PM

dtownral
All American
19498 Posts
user info
edit post

They have bug nets

2/27/2017 5:30:15 AM

neodata686
All American
11411 Posts
user info
edit post

Quote :
"All the marketing words aside. Hammock camping may be advantageous in situations where it's hot, there exist plenty of trees, are no bugs. Please let me know when you find this location."


Actually it's advantageous pretty much anywhere there are trees. Whenever I go desert camping or camp above treeline I can't hammock camp but all the other times I'm in my hammock.

Also it's far better than a tent when it's cold especially when there's snow on the ground. Pitching a tent in snow isn't always fun. Being able to quickly set up a hammock between two trees in the snow is great. I'm also significantly warmer in a hammock with a good under quilt than in a tent with only a sleeping bag and pad.

Here's my last winter backpacking set up:



We spent a good bit of time digging out tunnels before setting up.

2/28/2017 10:50:53 AM

 Message Boards » The Lounge » ANYTHING CAMPING/BACKPACKING Page 1 ... 36 37 38 39 [40], Prev  
go to top | |
Admin Options : move topic | lock topic

© 2017 by The Wolf Web - All Rights Reserved.
The material located at this site is not endorsed, sponsored or provided by or on behalf of North Carolina State University.
Powered by CrazyWeb v2.37 - our disclaimer.