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ScHpEnXeL
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I KNOW this thread has been done before but I keep getting errors when I try to search for it. I'm interested in starting to fly and would like to know where to start..as far as local clubs, school, etc. Any info would be appreciated.

8/12/2007 1:02:34 AM

Lowjack
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CarZin

8/12/2007 1:23:31 AM

roguewarrior
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Nearest local airport...
I got mine in burlington when I was still in high school

i know there are a couple small strips in the raleigh area..not sure exactly where though..
I just packed up my charts a couple days ago or I'd take a peak at them to see

[Edited on August 13, 2007 at 3:40 PM. Reason : moving back to raleigh soon..]

8/13/2007 3:37:39 PM

Mr. Joshua
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Flightgest out at RDU is good, but the prices are expensive and its sometimes hard to get a plane on short notice.

You could drive out to Franklin county or some other small airport in the area every weekend, but it was hard for me to build up any momentum with my training doing that. I got about halfway through mine and then decided to go to an accelerated school in Florida where I wrapped it up in under 4 weeks usually flying for at least 3 hours a day and spending the rest studying or in class.

8/13/2007 3:40:31 PM

roguewarrior
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Its a lot easier to start somewhere out of the way..to get the hang of things
and not having to worry about a tower/control is nice for beginners

8/13/2007 3:42:07 PM

Mr. Joshua
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^ It definitely is.

But after getting my PPL and flying mostly Class D airports I felt like I was very ill prepared to fly into charlie or bravo airports. I actually came back to RDU and got an instructor to do 2 flights with me just so I could get the radio stuff right and deal with juggling clearance delivery, approach/departure, tower and ground.

8/13/2007 4:00:38 PM

0108
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What are some web sites to read up on getting the license (ie - what all has to be done, hours, etc.) and any other advice for those just looking into it like myself. I have always been interested in flying and would like to explore it more. Thanks!

8/13/2007 4:24:33 PM

roguewarrior
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^^I had the same issue...so it is definitely advised to do at least a little bit under those conditions
I wouldn't recommend it right away though

http://www.bestaviation.net
this site has a pretty good run down of most of the schools in the state

8/13/2007 4:39:09 PM

Gonzo18
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Since carzin hasn't responded yet, I'll say what he is going to say.
http://www.empire-aviation.com

[Edited on August 13, 2007 at 4:44 PM. Reason : ']

8/13/2007 4:44:20 PM

ScHpEnXeL
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what happened here... haha

8/13/2007 8:46:12 PM

Wolfpackman
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I'd recommend checking out Franklin Co. and Sanford-Lee Co. Airports.

8/13/2007 9:16:06 PM

bous
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i started flying out of flightgest at RDU.

i would recommend learning at the class C airspace... overcoming the radio is one of the toughest learning curves of flying imo.

8/13/2007 11:16:29 PM

gk2004
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Went for my first ride in a small plane Sunday. Not as exciting as I thought it would be. Hell of a good time though. No real sense of speed. I would be interested on getting my PPL somewhere down the road.

1990 RV-4 180 Hp








[Edited on August 13, 2007 at 11:23 PM. Reason : Pics]

8/13/2007 11:16:46 PM

ScHpEnXeL
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I'm living in Asheboro a few days a week, Spartanburg SC for work tue-thur and little river SC for the weekends. So, I'm obviously open to travel. I'll be back in school in Jan. and would like to have at least gotten a significant way into this by then.

8/13/2007 11:23:23 PM

roguewarrior
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asheboro has a nice little field if i remember correctly

8/13/2007 11:26:41 PM

bous
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i fly in a friend's RV-6 a lot... 220mph 200ft above the ocean is crazy.

8/13/2007 11:29:03 PM

ScHpEnXeL
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yeah i think they do, or so I've heard.. Hell it's probably not too expensive either. I know my mom's boss (peddycord) used to have a lot to do with aviation around here until he died..in a plane wreck.

8/13/2007 11:38:38 PM

Luv2Fly
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Ya'll -

There is a private airport near NC STATE in Apex where I keep my Piper. It is right on 64 West just before NC 55. We have a breakfast meeting every third Saturday of the month. I would definately recommend coming out and meeting some of the old timer pilots in the area before making any decisions on where to train. I learned more from "hangar flying" than I ever did in a "formal" training environment.

As far as local schools: Franklin County has some limited training with a 172 and maybe a 152 - lots of helicopter activity though. They keep going in transitions over there.

Smithfield/Johnston Co has an excellent airport and fairly good school, but they are a little pricey. Their airplanes are great, however. They fly a few 172's and a beautiful 182 with the GNS480 / ADS-B.

Raleigh Durham has Flight Gest for the casual student and flies almost all brand new Cessnas (therefore the "brand new" high prices"). I think learning to fly in a busy airport like Raleigh Durham is totally over-rated. You waste a LOT of time on the ground that is charged to you at the same rate as when you are in the air. I learned out of an small private grass strip and now fly commercially - trust me, I'm more ahead of the game than many of the pilots who came out of structured schools at "busy" airports.

Sanford-Lee County (about a 20 minute drive from Apex) is my choice out of all of the local airports. They have good rates on an older Cessna 172 at the main office, a school flying brand new Allegro airplanes at $70/hr (a steal) and a flying club who's main focus is on training. In the club you pay a monthly fee, in exchange for access to rent very nice planes at a very good price. Works well for those wanting to really buckle down and fly several hours a month.

I'd be glad to talk to any of you about flying/training options. Come out to Cox Field in Apex sometime and hitch a ride with one of us.

-drew

8/13/2007 11:47:13 PM

Wraith
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So if I were to take up flying lessons, typically how many hours a week are spent with them? I read somewhere that most people do stuff three times a week for a few hours (either classroom or cockpit time) and was wondering how flexible most places are and how "necessary" it is that you have your lessons close to each other.

8/14/2007 9:07:12 AM

ilopan86
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^^Just out of curiousity, how do helicopter lessons work? Cheaper, pricier, easier, harder, etc...

8/14/2007 10:54:34 AM

lrb1127
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It is best to do about 2 lessons per week, and each lesson will be between 1 and 2 hours - part of which will be a ground lesson and part will be flying. The flight schools are flexible with your scheduling. It is for your own benefit that you fly at least twice a week so that you actually retain the information you learn. Also, one way to save a little money...buy a Private Pilot FAA Knowledge Test from Gleim or Jeppesen and teach yourself the written test information. This will eliminate some of the $20+/hr time with an instructor. After you study that book, you just have your instructor sign something saying that you are prepared to take the written exam and then go take the exam. You will still have to do ground lessons to prepare for each flight and for the practical exam, but it won't be nearly as much.

8/14/2007 10:57:11 AM

bous
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checkride.com


buy the groundschool private pilot to study while at work

8/14/2007 1:52:10 PM

bous
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Quote :
"^^Just out of curiousity, how do helicopter lessons work? Cheaper, pricier, easier, harder, etc..."


pricier
harder

8/14/2007 1:52:59 PM

roguewarrior
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I eliminated for the most part ground school through the flight school by buying a computer based home course...

I just followed the lessons on that.and passed the tests my instructors gave me to ensure I knew everything
Saved me a bit of money that way....

8/14/2007 2:46:42 PM

CarZin
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Yup, others have already said it. I dont recommend RDU unless you have a lot of money to blow. The instruction is fine from what I know, but it is more costly to learn at RDU than at a place like Lake Ridge. If cash is no object, then you might not mind paying $130+ an hour for an airplane with a glass panel, but if you are like most of us, the regular panel will do just fine for 70-90 an hour. at RDU you will spend a lot more time on the ramp taxiing for departure, and a good percentage of your time will be getting away from RDU so you can practice landings and procedures outside of controlled airspace. Paul Hesse at Empire is awesome. Paul knows me well (Ryan) even though I dont rent from him anymore (I own a share in an airplane).

There are some local clubs, but local as in Sanford. Not a short drive. There is still some training at Louisburg, and it is cheaper than Raleigh, but not too much cheaper.

I would suggest passing your written before you start taking lessons. It will serve two purposes: (1) get that aggrivating shit out of the way and (2) help prove if you are really cut out for the type of committment that is required to get the license in the first place.

I got my license in under 3 months. I had the money ready, and took one lesson after another and finished in 42 hours. I preferred that method as there is less relearning from each lesson. And despite the fact that I learned to fly out at lake ridge, my plane is at RDU and I have no problems dealing with towered airports and routinely take trips in excess of 400 nautical miles. Send me PMs if you have more questions.

Helicopters are astronomical to rent and train in. Avoid at all cost unless you really have a lot of money in your pocket.

[Edited on August 14, 2007 at 3:01 PM. Reason : .]

8/14/2007 2:58:36 PM

Mr. Joshua
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Quote :
"I would suggest passing your written before you start taking lessons. It will serve two purposes: (1) get that aggrivating shit out of the way and (2) help prove if you are really cut out for the type of committment that is required to get the license in the first place."


I've never heard of people doing that. Not a bad idea though.

8/14/2007 4:12:06 PM

CarZin
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yeah, I did it. Read the Jeppsen text front to back, The Killing Zone and a few other books then used the gleim online test prep. I think my score was a 94 (only 70 required to pass). It does help to start day 1 with good background knowledge.

8/14/2007 4:18:49 PM

Mr. Joshua
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^ Well done on the written!

The Killing Zone is a great book. I give a copy to every friend who goes for their PPL.

8/14/2007 5:41:34 PM

theDuke866
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Quote :
"Went for my first ride in a small plane Sunday. Not as exciting as I thought it would be. Hell of a good time though. No real sense of speed. I would be interested on getting my PPL somewhere down the road.

1990 RV-4 180 Hp"


oh man, RVs are a blast. if you weren't excited in an RV-4, God help if you if you ever find yourself in, say, a Cessna 152.

Quote :
"i fly in a friend's RV-6 a lot... 220mph 200ft above the ocean is crazy."


haha, i've done about twice that fast at about that altitude above the ground (and at about 75 degrees angle of bank, pulling a few g's)

there's a user on this website that did i believe 500 kts at like 37 feet agl or something...and I know a guy who did 540 kts at 75' in a Tomcat.

Quote :
" I dont recommend RDU unless you have a lot of money to blow"


Quote :
"Helicopters are astronomical to rent and train in. Avoid at all cost unless you really have a lot of money in your pocket."


yep; yep

although i've done some fun stuff (riding) in a Jet Ranger


oh, and exams4pilots.org is another good website. free, too.




oh, and they're about to add a Citabria to the rental fleet at the Navy Flying Club by my house...think they're gonna charge like $70/hour--wet. They have T-34s for $100/hour, too.

8/14/2007 9:05:38 PM

gk2004
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Quote :
"Quote :
"Went for my first ride in a small plane Sunday. Not as exciting as I thought it would be. Hell of a good time though. No real sense of speed. I would be interested on getting my PPL somewhere down the road.

1990 RV-4 180 Hp"


oh man, RVs are a blast. if you weren't excited in an RV-4, God help if you if you ever find yourself in, say, a Cessna 152.
"



I probally worded that wrong. I was a hellva lot of fun. It was just alot different than I had worked up in my mind.

[Edited on August 14, 2007 at 11:29 PM. Reason : .]

8/14/2007 11:28:16 PM

bous
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if you weren't excited in an rv-4+ you've got the wrong hobby

but ya if that was your first ride... that's always way diff. than what you work up in your mind.


my first was in a c152 and that was like driving an accord in the sky

[Edited on August 15, 2007 at 12:08 AM. Reason : ]

8/15/2007 12:06:54 AM

wizzkidd
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private pilots are about as safe as 15yr olds with learners permits. If you're going to go that route you need to understand that you're paying a shit ton of money to go on the MOST DANGEROUS flights of you life, and you'll have no idea how dangerous they are.

If you're gonna get a private PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE get instrument rated... or at least know the basics of IFR flight. (approaches, STARS, and IFR Navigation)

Lastly, Until you know what you're doing stay the fuck away from military fields. If one more of you fucking cessna guys cuts me off in the VFR pattern or doesn't know he's flying strait through a final approach course for the approach in use for a 130,000lb airplane and makes me go missed I'm gonna fucking scream!!!

^C152 is like a damn GEO in the sky.

[Edited on August 15, 2007 at 12:55 AM. Reason : .]

8/15/2007 12:54:14 AM

ilopan86
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^The learning permit point has crossed my mind before

I watched Rescue Dawn about the navy pilot Dieter Dengler today; it was really good

8/15/2007 1:41:26 AM

CarZin
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Flying can most certainly cost you your life, but the the actual accident rate, even for VFR pilots, is extremely low. The way I look at it as far as risk is concerned it flying should be considered more dangerous than driving, and less dangerous than riding a motorcycle.

I think the most important thing for pilots is not necessarily the rating they obtain, but the currency they have (how often you fly) and your decision making ability.

If you fly often, you will have mastery with your aircraft, and also know your abilities (I can fly in X high ceiling with X visibility). I do agree that you should be hood trained quite a bit even if you are not going to get an IFR ticket. You will fly into clouds and low visibility, and you need to know you can handle it. VFR pilots flying into IMC conditions is the number one killer of pilots. The problem I see with rating chasers is the following:

They rush to get their VFR...
They rush to get their IFR...
They now how a decent number of supervised hours, but little to real flying time making decisions on their own. They bite off more than they can chew, and end up killing themselves. I think getting your VFR license, building 100+ hours with it flying all over the place, then working on your instrument is the right approach. You have to enjoy your license at some point, and its best ti build your decision making abilities in VFR weather as opposed to IFR.


[Edited on August 15, 2007 at 10:27 AM. Reason : .]

8/15/2007 10:08:33 AM

CarZin
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Hate to double post:

Accident rates in 2006 for all GENERAL aviation aircraft are 9 accidents per 100,000 flight hours.

See the full 2006 report here:
http://www.aopa.org/asf/publications/06nall.pdf?pl=ICOCNALL

8/15/2007 10:27:02 AM

wizzkidd
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My point with learning IFR flight princibles is not about flying through the weather, it's about knowing where other people are. If you hear that they're holding at 6000 at the 083/15 from RDU you need to know what that means so you know where to look for these people and if you're anywhere near them. (for folks that fly around raliegh... I just made that up, I haven't flown around there yet) OR if you hear that they're on 9mi final on the ILS 13, DON"T FLY THROUGH THE DAMN GLIDE PATH!!! (I'm mad b/c it happened to me recently)

[Edited on August 15, 2007 at 11:40 AM. Reason : .]

8/15/2007 11:38:18 AM

gk2004
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Quote :
"but ya if that was your first ride... that's always way diff. than what you work up in your mind.


my first was in a c152 and that was like driving an accord in the sky

"



Whats what I was trying to say

8/15/2007 1:00:36 PM

Joshua
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I've always wanted to fly, but I passed up flight school (at a community college) and military for Aerospace Engineering. Now that I finally got a job in Lynchburg VA and settled in, I'm going to start flight training at the first of the year. The first flight school quoted me $200/hr for flying lessons. That's like $10K if it takes you 50 hours! I was looking for something around $100/hr. Hopefully I'll find someone in the area.

How many of you guys have collected IFR liscense or more? And how many of you have fun with just the basic PPL?

8/15/2007 4:01:53 PM

Mr. Joshua
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$200/hr?! Jeebus.

I'm VFR only right now and it scares me how little I know. I'm basically building hours to get IFR asap.

8/15/2007 4:10:12 PM

wizzkidd
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Yea dude.. flying is expensive .... I have NO IEDA how you civ kids do it. I could never put up the $$$ if I hadn't gotten the navy to hook me up.

Now I'm instrument, complex, single and multi-engine rated with roughly 250hrs. Next month I'll be NATOPS qualified in the P-3C Orion (old lockheed electra)

8/15/2007 4:15:36 PM

JHH Wolfpack
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I fly weekly in a C152 and that this is a pos. It gets the job done for doing aerial telemetry and is pretty cheap in comparision to flying in some of the other planes that we could fly in. A friend has a Piper SuperCub and that this is amazing. I love flying with that guy. Its nothing like flying 40-50 feet above the trees.

8/15/2007 4:32:24 PM

Skack
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I have flown with CarZin a couple of times and I thought he did really well. It did freak me out a little when we were going over the Chesapeake Bay in pitch black darkness and he said "this is exactly how JFK Jr. died."

8/15/2007 4:49:52 PM

Wraith
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So what is a typical total amount that one would pay for getting their PPL? Including all plane rentals/fuel/instruction, etc? Here on base they have a flying club that is open only to military/NASA employees and they claim to be cheaper than a regular one. Their website reports approximately $3800 to get your PPL. How does that stack up?

8/15/2007 5:05:21 PM

guth
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Quote :
"There is a private airport near NC STATE in Apex where I keep my Piper. It is right on 64 West just before NC 55. We have a breakfast meeting every third Saturday of the month. I would definately recommend coming out and meeting some of the old timer pilots in the area before making any decisions on where to train. I learned more from "hangar flying" than I ever did in a "formal" training environment."

are you the one with the yellow piper cub?

8/15/2007 6:25:27 PM

Skack
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Quote :
"There is a private airport near NC STATE in Apex where I keep my Piper. It is right on 64 West just before NC 55. We have a breakfast meeting every third Saturday of the month. I would definately recommend coming out and meeting some of the old timer pilots in the area before making any decisions on where to train. I learned more from "hangar flying" than I ever did in a "formal" training environment."


I've seen that place. There is at least one more private airport community between Raleigh and Jordan Lake, but I think there might be two more iirc.

8/15/2007 6:32:58 PM

zxappeal
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If you look in his gallery, you'll see a red and white Piper short-span plane. I don't know whether it's a Pacer, or maybe a Vagabond, though. I'm thinking Pacer, 'cause it's got a fatter fuselage, and the Pacer is a 4-seater.

8/15/2007 6:39:41 PM

lrb1127
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Quote :
"So what is a typical total amount that one would pay for getting their PPL?"


The average person will spend about $6000 - $8000 for their PPL.

8/16/2007 11:45:20 PM

Wraith
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Holy crap, looks like a really good deal here on base then.

8/17/2007 8:51:41 PM

ScHpEnXeL
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Damn $3800?? That's awesome. I'm going to budget $10K when I decide to do this so I will have NO concerns with going over budget and can concentrate on what I'm trying to accompish instead of thinking about the money...

CarZin if you dont mind me asking, can you give anymore info on how much the plane you own a portion of costs you??

8/17/2007 11:27:53 PM

theDuke866
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^^ yeah, if you actually get it done for that, it will be a great deal. what base are you at?

that might be the minimum, though. if you average $100/hour or a little less (quite reasonable in something like a Cessna 152, even factoring in the dual instruction time) and go to a Part 141 school (legally can get your license in as little as 35 flight hours), that's $3500, plus a few hundred for books, ground instruction, and FAA testing.

it is technically possible, but it basically never happens.

if you actually can reasonably get it done for that amount of money, that would be dirt cheap.

I'd say $6-8k is a pretty reasonable estimate, although I'd say more like $5k-8k.

8/17/2007 11:49:58 PM

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