User not logged in - login - register
Home Calendar Books School Tool Photo Gallery Message Boards Users Statistics Advertise Site Info
go to bottom | |
 Message Boards » » What conspiracy theories do you believe in? Page 1 2 3 [4], Prev  
Krallum
56A0D3
15294 Posts
user info
edit post

False flag yo

I'm Krallum and I approved this message.

12/1/2014 1:05:42 PM

beatsunc
All American
10650 Posts
user info
edit post

republicans and democrats are actually the same party

12/1/2014 6:22:15 PM

theDuke866
All American
52651 Posts
user info
edit post

From the screentest post on page 1:

Quote :
"the CIA sold drugs to US citizens"


I don't know if they sold them in the context you're probably saying, but they absolutely did administer drugs to US citizens for experiments. They tested chem weapons on US servicemen. All kinds of crazy shit.

Quote :
"McVeigh didn't act alone"


Umm, yeah, Terry Nichols is serving a life sentence for his part in it.

Quote :
"the US govt has undercut democratic efforts in many countries, destabilizing elected governments and instilling US friendly despots "


again, that's all pretty common knowledge.

Quote :
"every war ever fought has been primarily about making someone more wealthy, not protecting the public at large"


It's not that the latter is never a factor, but I think that it's pretty much widely accepted that the former is nearly always a factor at some level.

12/1/2014 10:27:11 PM

theDuke866
All American
52651 Posts
user info
edit post

dtownral: Dave Mustaine sings and plays guitar (and is the frontman/primary creative force) in Megadeth. He's endearing in some ways, and an arrogant prick in others. He made a conversion to Christianity many years ago, and is also relatively nutty on conspiracy stuff. Oddly, he endorsed Rick Santorum for President last time, hahaha. That's right, the main man in fuckin' Megadeth is a Santorum voter, hahaha.

Quote :
"Totally believe it. I mean, he's not dead yet, but I wouldn't be surprised if people who make enemies with the US government suspiciously go missing."


Umm, or the Russians. Assange fucked with them a ton, and they definitely have an extensive and relatively recent history of bumping off people who cross them.

Quote :
"the goal of the authors of obamacare was to make private healthcare so expensive the dumb masses will demand the govt "fix" it with a single payer system"


I've long thought that, although I don't know if they deliberately made it suck dick for that purpose. I think it's more of a slippery slope strategy.


Quote :
"Monsanto Company is secretly maneuvering to control the world's food supply using GMOs"


Quote :
"do you all mean that, as a company, they would like to control the entire world agricultural market? Or do mean that they actually want to control all of the food in the world (for some implied nefarious purpose)?

Only the second is really a conspiracy theory, so I'm only adding it if that is what you mean."


Yeah obviously they're all for market domination; that's not really a conspiracy theory. If you are implying what dtownral posted, then I must argue that Monsanto sues farmers who save GMO seed from their crops to replant. That action is contrary to any effort towards maximum proliferation like they would want if they were trying what you say they are.

Quote :
"i don't think seal team 6 killed bin laden"


I don't know if it was rigidly comprised of SEAL Team 6; that is really immaterial, anyway. JSOC is just that-Joint. It could have well been a mix of SEALs, MARSOC, Delta, CIA, etc...but I don't feel like that's the narrow distinction you were really arguing.

I will say that I don't believe that they just bought him back to base, flew him out to a ship, did a DNA test, and chucked his ass into the ocean. I would bet an enormous sum that he was brought back to some CIA lab and dissected/tested/studied in great detail. If he was not, then I would be inclined to say that we were derelict in our duties.

12/1/2014 10:52:18 PM

EMCE
balls deep
89691 Posts
user info
edit post

Osama Bin Laden's head is kept alive with electrodes, and is located in the basement of the White House. On an almost daily basis, either Bush or Obama will go visit him and piss on his tongue.

12/1/2014 10:59:51 PM

Klatypus
All American
6786 Posts
user info
edit post

HAARP is real

12/1/2014 11:08:34 PM

theDuke866
All American
52651 Posts
user info
edit post

I don't know if this qualifies as a conspiracy theory, but I believe that the NSA collects basically every piece of data that an electronic record is transmitted of, certainly within the US, and across most of the rest of the world (and maybe pretty much all of it).

All emails, all text messages, all credit card transactions, hell pretty much all financial transactions, all internet searches. I think that basically if it's transmitted, it's collected and stored by the NSA. I don't know how much they actually look at it all; I think they likely just collect the data until they either have a reason to look at it, or until they have the capability process all of it en masse (which I think they're developing, if they don't have it already). It won't matter how much it's encrypted.

The NSA has some fucking crazy capabilities outside of the Snowden-disclosure realm...between the little bit I know from what I used to do, and the stuff that's been either leaked (Snowden stuff) or uncovered and reported by journalists (giant data center, Bush/Obama justice department and FISA stuff, etc), I think that they are doing some wild stuff on a scale most people wouldn't believe.


I think that cell phone/GPS data and license plate/facial recognition scanners are WAY more widely employed and used than is widely known. I keep a cover on my license plate that prevents it from being viewed off-axis or from above. It's one of those things where there's no real reason that the data can't be stored forever, so even if I'm not overly concerned about it in the day-to-day right now, I still take that simple step to prevent it, because there's little reason not to in my mind.

Another thing that is 100% for certain is that almost all modern cars record every input you make. Every throttle/brake/steering input, yaw and acceleration rates, whether you have your seatbelt on, engine rpm, vehicle speed, etc. If you are in a wreck, it's a subpoena away from being used against you in criminal or civil proceedings (and in some places, I think can be collected at the scene with no subpoena, etc). It is becoming more and more common. Depending on local laws, it also becomes property of your insurance company if your car is totaled and surrendered to them. No fuckin' thanks, dude. I bought a car without an EDR.

12/1/2014 11:08:47 PM

Kurtis636
All American
14984 Posts
user info
edit post

Oh fuck yeah they collect everything. Have you seen the size of their data storage complexes? I mean I can't even fathom how much data storage they have. I have a feeling they're sitting on exabytes of stored communication information.

It's really just a matter of when they develop an algorithm or intelligence to process that data before they can start to put it to use.

[Edited on December 1, 2014 at 11:14 PM. Reason : sdfsd]

12/1/2014 11:13:32 PM

theDuke866
All American
52651 Posts
user info
edit post

Yeah their new data storage facility was what led me to that conclusion, and then just a few months after I learned about that, Snowden confirmed a lot of it.

[Edited on December 1, 2014 at 11:17 PM. Reason : it's enough to store the entirety of the internet for decades or centuries to come or something]

[Edited on December 1, 2014 at 11:17 PM. Reason : ]

12/1/2014 11:16:09 PM

synapse
play so hard
60908 Posts
user info
edit post

Quote :
"it's enough to store the entirety of the internet for decades or centuries to come or something"


Not that I don't believe you, but do you have a link or something?

Quote :
"I think that cell phone/GPS data and license plate/facial recognition scanners are WAY more widely employed and used than is widely known."


Maybe...maybe not. You're a bit more paranoid than most on these points, but perhaps that's a good thing.

Quote :
" If you are in a wreck, it's a subpoena away from being used against you in criminal or civil proceedings"


So there's a history of this data being subpoena'd on the regular? Again, not that I don't believe you, I'm just curious. It seems like if it was just a subpoena away I'd have heard of more cases of it being used.

Quote :
"It's really just a matter of when they develop an algorithm or intelligence to process that data before they can start to put it to use."


There's that whole matter of encryption too...



[Edited on December 1, 2014 at 11:39 PM. Reason : ]

12/1/2014 11:31:05 PM

Kurtis636
All American
14984 Posts
user info
edit post

Yeah, but didn't the NSA basically start out as a code breaking agency? Cracking encryption seems like exactly the kind of thing an AI would be good at as well.

I think it's quite likely that they're collecting as much communication as possible in a large, dragnet kind of way and simultaneously working on a way to make it useful in either a predictive capacity or to develop an understanding of complex human networks and interaction.

I know it sounds a little nutty and far fetched (especially the AI stuff) but there's got to be some reason they're gathering up large piles of seemingly useless information.

12/1/2014 11:46:43 PM

theDuke866
All American
52651 Posts
user info
edit post

Quote :
"Not that I don't believe you, but do you have a link or something?"


http://www.wired.com/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/all/

(I read this months before anyone knew who Snowden is)


http://www.npr.org/2013/06/10/190160772/amid-data-controversy-nsa-builds-its-biggest-data-farm

The CEO of Google said that the totality of human knowledge since the dawn of man would take about 5 exabytes to store. Cisco estimated global internet traffic to reach almost 1000 exabytes, or 1 zettabyte, per year by 2015.

An NSA technical director turned whistleblower estimates the Utah center's capacity at 5 zettabytes, or 5000 exabytes.

Other estimates are dramatically lower (3-12 exabytes on day one when the doors opened, but being designed for future expansion).

A Pentagon report from a few years back apparently discussed expansion into the realm of "yottabytes", which are 1000 zettabytes (or 1,000,000 exabytes). The NSA deflects the question, of course, but basically says "it's really big, and we plan on growing it as tech development allows".


So...the short answer is that it depends on which estimates are correct, and then on how big and how fast it is expanded, and I expect that they are doing DARPA-type research...it's not like they're just piling shitloads of Seagate drives from Best Buy into a warehouse.

I will offer you a quote from that former NSA technical director out of one of those articles:

"They would have plenty of space with five zettabytes to store at least something on the order of 100 years worth of the worldwide communications, phones and emails and stuff like that," Binney asserts, "and then have plenty of space left over to do any kind of parallel processing to try to break codes."


Quote :
"Maybe...maybe not. You're a bit more paranoid than most on these points, but perhaps that's a good thing."


Dude...Pensacola has license plate scanners.

here you go:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2013/07/17/license-plate-scanners-aclu-privacy/2524939/



and has it occurred to you that my aversion (you call it paranoia, but I would say that implies that I'm wrong and imagining it) to it is not only ideological, and not only because I follow it and at least slightly understand it technically, but partly because of what I did for a living for a decade?


(I think facial recognition stuff is much less ubiquitous, but up and coming)

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-27037009



Oh, and here's one more thing regarding cell phones:

https://www.aclu.org/maps/stingray-tracking-devices-whos-got-them

I won't say much on these, but there's no reason they need to be mounted permanently on a big tower, and they aren't so expensive as to prohibit widespread employment.

Quote :
"So there's a history of this data being subpoena'd on the regular? Again, not that I don't believe you, I'm just curious. It seems like if it was just a subpoena away I'd have heard of more cases of it being used."


I don't know how regularly; I can't quantify it. I do know that it is being used in both criminal and civil proceedings.

Nav systems and stuff like OnStar, BMW Assist, etc are also troubling, but at least you can avoid purchasing those options and/or easily disable them.

http://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/embedded-systems/the-automotive-black-box-data-dilemma

http://www.lawyersandsettlements.com/blog/tag/event-data-recorder

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2013/03/24/car-spying-edr-data-privacy/1991751/

http://training.sae.org/seminars/c1210/

There is an emerging industry of interpreting this data for accident investigation purposes and/or teaching law enforcement personnel how to do it.


...and let's not forget the insurance angle, too:

http://www.cdr-system.com/industries/insurance.html

Quote :
"There's that whole matter of encryption too..."


NSA is developing a new classified supercomputer that will be something like 1000x faster than the next fastest known computer, and of course it's not like they will stop development there. It's a cat and mouse game--stronger encryption, and stronger capabilities to break it.

Real (or near real) time code-breaking is one thing, but if you give them time to churn it, I can't imagine that there's anything the NSA wouldn't eventually break...particularly the sort of stuff that normal people would use.

[Edited on December 2, 2014 at 1:44 AM. Reason : the surveillance state, from 3-letter agencies down to small local PDs, is out of control.]

12/2/2014 1:43:20 AM

theDuke866
All American
52651 Posts
user info
edit post

Oh, and every once in a while when someone actually holds the spy agencies to the limitations of the law, they just farm it out to partner nations (UK, etc) who then do the spying and report back...and of course the relationship is reciprocal.

___________________________

SOME of this (maybe not the high-level NSA stuff) is the nerdier, whiter-collar, lesser known side of GWOT tech proliferating into domestic law enforcement. It's police militarization...it's just not as in-your-face as driving around in MRAPs, etc.

[Edited on December 2, 2014 at 1:57 AM. Reason : ]

12/2/2014 1:46:13 AM

mr hands
Suspended
98 Posts
user info
edit post

synapse = jcg15

12/2/2014 6:46:48 AM

Wyld Stallyn
Suspended
1087 Posts
user info
edit post

Ron Paul is an Indigo Child

12/2/2014 8:28:42 AM

synapse
play so hard
60908 Posts
user info
edit post

Thanks for the links Duke. I'll get back to you in a month when I've consumed them all

Quote :
"Dude...Pensacola has license plate scanners. "


Yeah I know Raleigh has used them at one point too, but it was pretty controversial. I'm just wondering how widespread their use is.

Quote :
" a 2012 survey by the not-for-profit Police Executive Research Forum found that 71% of police agencies now use them."


Wow! That number seems higher than the percentage that use dash cams.

Quote :
"and has it occurred to you that my aversion (you call it paranoia, but I would say that implies that I'm wrong and imagining it)"


Yeah that was the wrong word...Aversion is more accurate.

Regarding EDRs-
Quote :
" But without federal laws governing who should have access to black box data, the matter was left to the states. Thus far, only 13 states have passed laws governing the ownership of EDR data. And this geographical patchwork means that a car owner’s rights depend on where he is when his fender gets bent. In the 37 states without EDR laws, there are no ground rules preventing insurance companies from obtaining the data"


So yeah it's very much an evolving issue.

Quote :
"the surveillance state, from 3-letter agencies down to small local PDs, is out of control"


Evidently You should start a blog or something

[Edited on December 2, 2014 at 9:44 AM. Reason : ^^ ^^ more like, mr hands = jcg15 AMIRITE?]

12/2/2014 9:44:41 AM

theDuke866
All American
52651 Posts
user info
edit post

Quote :
"So yeah it's very much an evolving issue. "


It is, but even in those states where privacy protection laws exist and the data is explicitly declared to be property of the vehicle's owner, there are universal provisions for courts to obtain it via warrant or subpoena. That's fine; that's like any other data or documentation.

My quarrel is that the vehicles are designed such that it isn't reasonably possible to turn the data collection off. If it doesn't exist, you can't subpoena it. You can buy a car without an EDR, but there are very few choices, and it gets tougher all the time as the last few European holdouts install them, and as the vehicles vehicles produced without them age.

There is bipartisan legislation in work to bolster privacy protection laws, and more importantly, require that EDRs be able to be disabled by the user. It's sponsored by a (D), but with (R)s as the majority of the co-sponsors. Contact your Rep and ask for support of it.

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr2414



Oh, and even if privacy laws give the data to the owner, your insurance company is still the owner if your car is declared a total loss.

12/2/2014 10:38:05 AM

mr hands
Suspended
98 Posts
user info
edit post

^^you would be incorrect.

12/2/2014 10:44:49 AM

mr hands
Suspended
98 Posts
user info
edit post

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-12-01/was-most-valuable-company-history-worth-10-times-more-apple

I believe what this fellow is pushing Ab the decline of the dollar and the downfall of ouour financial system as a whole.

12/2/2014 11:07:14 AM

PaulISdead
All American
8561 Posts
user info
edit post

Oh I just don't know anymore

6/1/2020 8:46:34 PM

Bullet
All American
27837 Posts
user info
edit post

https://www.npr.org/2024/03/27/1241001030/-baltimore-bridge-collapse-conspiracy-theories

3/27/2024 12:34:36 PM

Kickstand
All American
11375 Posts
user info
edit post

I heard that container ships could melt bridge girders. It's kind of like jet fuel melting sky scraper steel beams.

3/27/2024 2:29:42 PM

Bullet
All American
27837 Posts
user info
edit post

I saw explosions in the video. It was a controlled demo. It couldn't have been done more perfectly. It was planned to a tee.

3/27/2024 2:45:59 PM

Kickstand
All American
11375 Posts
user info
edit post

Copied from a nutjob on Facebook:

Quote :
"Lara Logan on Baltimore Bridge Collapse
Multiple intel sources: Baltimore bridge collapse was an “absolutely brilliant strategic attack” on US critical infrastructure - most likely cyber - & our intel agencies know it. In information warfare terms, they just divided the US along the Mason Dixon line exactly like the Civil War.
Second busiest strategic roadway in the nation for hazardous material now down for 4-5 years - which is how long they say it will take to recover. Bridge was built specifically to move hazardous material - fuel, diesel, propane gas, nitrogen, highly flammable materials, chemicals and oversized cargo that cannot fit in the tunnels - that supply chain now crippled.
Make no mistake: this was an extraordinary attack in terms of planning, timing & execution.
The two critical components on that bridge are the two load-bearing pylons on each end, closest to the shore. They are bigger, thicker and deeper than anything else. These are the anchor points and they knew that hitting either one one of them would be a fatal wound to the integrity of the bridge.
Half a mile of bridge went in the river - likely you will have to build a new one. Also caused so much damage to the structural integrity of the bottom concrete part that you cannot see & won’t know until they take the wreckage apart. Structural destruction likely absolute.
Attack perfectly targeted.
“They have figured out how to bring us down. As long as you stay away from the teeth of the US military, you can pick the US apart. We are arrogant and ignorant - lethal combination. Obama said they would fundamentally change America and they did. We are in a free-fall ride on a roller coaster right now - no brakes - just picking up speed.”
The footage shows the cargo ship never got in the approach lane in the channel. You have to be in the channel before you get into that turn. Location was precise/deliberate: chose a bend in the river where you have to slow down and commit yourself - once you are committed in that area there is not enough room to maneuver.
Should have had a harbor pilot to pilot the boat. You are not supposed to traverse any obstacles without the harbor pilot.
They chose a full moon so they would have maximum tidal shift - rise and fall. Brisk flow in that river on a normal day & have had a lot of rain recently so water was already moving along at a good pace.
Hit it with enough kinetic energy to knock the load-bearing pylon out from under the highway - which fatally weakens the span and then 50 percent of the bridge fell into the water.
All these factors when you look at it - this is how you teach people how to do this type of attack and there are so few people left in the system who know this. We have a Junior varsity team on the field.
Tremendous navigational obstruction. Huge logistical nightmare to clean this up. Number of dead is tragic but not the whole measure of the attack.
That kind-of bridge constantly under repair - always at night because there is so much traffic and they cannot obstruct that during the day. So concern is for repair guys who were on foot (out of their vehicles) working who may now be in the water - 48 degrees at most at this time of year.
When you choke off Baltimore you have cut the main north-south hazardous corridor (I95) in half. Now has to go around the city - or go somewhere else.
To move some of that cargo through the tunnel you may be able to get a permit but those are slow to get and require an escort system that is expensive and has to be done at night.
For every $100 dollars that goes into the city, $12 comes from shipping. Believe this will cripple the city of Baltimore at a time when they do not have the resources to recover.
@lauralogan
@Brandenburh4Mi"


TLDR: Lara Logan is a journalist
Expert in structural engineering, marine engineering, shipping logistics, city planning, macro economics, resource management, and maritime law, just to name a few.

3/27/2024 5:11:19 PM

The Coz
Tempus Fugitive
24419 Posts
user info
edit post

Quote :
"Half a mile of bridge went in the river - likely you will have to build a new one."

Nah, I think they can just pick up the twisted scraps out of the river bottom and set them back up. We should be good in a couple weeks max.

3/27/2024 7:09:43 PM

beatsunc
All American
10650 Posts
user info
edit post

biden blew up the nord stream pipeline

3/27/2024 7:47:22 PM

 Message Boards » Chit Chat » What conspiracy theories do you believe in? Page 1 2 3 [4], Prev  
go to top | |
Admin Options : move topic | lock topic

© 2024 by The Wolf Web - All Rights Reserved.
The material located at this site is not endorsed, sponsored or provided by or on behalf of North Carolina State University.
Powered by CrazyWeb v2.38 - our disclaimer.