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 Message Boards » » "Democrat party credibility watch" Thread? Page 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7, Prev Next  
NyM410
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What are you even arguing? Has there ever been a single person on here defend DWS? Didn't everyone want her gone?

Apparently unlike you from the looks and sound of it, most on here don't eat shit sandwiches when they are served to us.

12/9/2016 9:56:25 AM

kdogg(c)
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Welp...not much more to do, Democrats, eh?

Your grasping at straws did nothing at all (more electoral voters bolted Hillary than Trump).

And then there are these tidbits. I'll start off with a good lead:

http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/19/politics/president-obama-npr-interview/index.html

https://spectator.org/the-democrats-attempted-coup/
http://nypost.com/2016/12/18/time-to-face-reality-obama-trump-is-going-to-be-president/
http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/how-the-left-could-understand-trump/article/2609882
http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidbahnsen1/2016/12/18/larry-kudlow-has-a-ph-d-in-making-the-left-hysterical/#e9e48794e7ba
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2016/12/19/reverse_political_correctness_poses_risk_for_democrats_132595.html
https://www.commentarymagazine.com/politics-ideas/campaigns-elections/whos-the-fluke-trump-or-obama-democrats/
http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/12/progressive-trump-vote-214534
https://www.thenation.com/article/the-road-not-taken/
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2016/12/09/harry_reid_dems_dogged_senate_leader_bids_farewell.html

12/19/2016 7:14:48 PM

NyM410
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Hopefully they learn from the GOP eight years ago and don't act like children who got their toys taken away. Although apparently doing absolutely nothing but fucking up the government and calling the sitting president a Kenyan Muslim gets you full control, so what do I know?

12/19/2016 9:38:15 PM

kdogg(c)
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I don't know. If DJT truly is cared about the "little man" (which it sounds like), the Dems would put themselves in danger if they went against things that DJT proposed to help the little man, especially with the midterms coming up in 2018. Of 33 Senators up for reelection, I think 23 are Democrats.

12/20/2016 6:19:28 AM

NyM410
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Quote :
"If DJT truly is cared about the "little man" (which it sounds like)"


lol I've been reading about Donald Trump since I was 7. To truly think he gives a single shit about anything but himself is so amazing to me that I have to think he is the greatest con-man ever.

How do people fall for this guys bullshit? Even what I have to believe are some intelligent people.

[Edited on December 20, 2016 at 7:31 AM. Reason : X]

12/20/2016 7:30:28 AM

dtownral
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bruh, donald trump doesn't give a flying fuck about the little man

12/20/2016 10:26:47 AM

Bullet
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Quote :
"If DJT truly is cared about the "little man" (which it sounds like)"


see, this is pretty chuckle-worthy. what has he ever done or said in his long public history that makes you believe this?

12/20/2016 10:38:38 AM

ElGimpy
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I think it's probably the gold plated home he built for himself that really shouts, "Everyone is just as good as me" the loudest

12/20/2016 11:28:26 AM

NyM410
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Or that he regularly called Apprentice guests niggers, cunts and retards apparently. What an every man.

12/20/2016 11:34:29 AM

Exiled
Eyes up here ^^
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Democratic Leadership's gameplan for the party over the next two years:

12/20/2016 11:49:41 AM

moron
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Quote :
"Hopefully they learn from the GOP eight years ago and don't act like children who got their toys taken away. Although apparently doing absolutely nothing but fucking up the government and calling the sitting president a Kenyan Muslim gets you full control, so what do I know?
"


This is basically a summary of our politics.

It's probably never been a meritocracy, but it's definitely not a meritocracy now.

How do democrats play the game from this point forward? Should they use fact-free invective like the Tea Partiers, should they double down on policy, or something else? There's no rules. It will take a creative visionary to find a way to take the high road and stay relevant.

12/20/2016 12:46:00 PM

Shrike
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Uh, the high road? Fuck that, they need to do what the Republicans did to Obama x1000. Use every legislative maneuver in the book to slow the Senate to a crawl and challenge everything Trump tries to do in court. Don't lend a single D vote to anything, let them own everything they pass and then bludgeon them with it in 2018/20. There's literally not a single thing Trump's proposed that's good for anyone but the rich. Even his infrastructure proposal is basically corporate welfare for private contractors. Obama's biggest failure is treating Republicans like honest brokers in government, not the mustache twirling villains that they've proven themselves to be. To them, anything proposed or passed by a liberal is illegitimate, it's time to start treating them in kind.

But before any of that, step one is STOP FIGHTING THE 2016 PRIMARY. It's over, move on, it's time to unify against a common enemy who's only goal is destroy everything progressives have accomplished since the 1920s.

[Edited on December 20, 2016 at 3:18 PM. Reason : .]

12/20/2016 3:14:53 PM

moron
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^ youre clearly not a creative visionary

12/20/2016 3:24:03 PM

dtownral
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Quote :
"But before any of that, step one is STOP FIGHTING THE 2016 PRIMARY. It's over, move on, it's time to unify against a common enemy who's only goal is destroy everything progressives have accomplished since the 1920s."

bruh we have been trying, its the establishment that is putting their heads in the sand and pretending like there aren't any problems to fix

12/20/2016 3:47:28 PM

adultswim
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^^^
The people you're telling to "unify" are mostly liberals, not "Democrats". Give them a reason to unify other than Trump.

12/21/2016 3:07:05 PM

JCE2011
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What exactly are "liberals" liberal about now, besides sex and drugs?

Classical liberalism is completely separate from the regressive authoritarian left... Y'all are leftists not liberals.

12/21/2016 3:12:41 PM

aaronburro
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Quote :
"But before any of that, step one is STOP FIGHTING THE 2016 PRIMARY."

Yup. Completely ignore that you rigged your own primary in order to pick the 2nd worst candidate for president in American history. Just forget that part!

12/23/2016 12:08:59 AM

Dentaldamn
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The two parties are so out of wack I don't know what's what.

The republicans have spend 8 years opposing everything Obama has done, even shit they once supported, that no one knows their ass from their elbow.

How we have a man with no concrete opinions going to the Oval Office. I think middle class white people are going to be just as poor and pissed off in 4 years.

12/23/2016 9:08:14 AM

moron
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We have the worst gerrymandering of any state in the country, and have the lowest ranking of "democracy" index of any state
http://www.newsobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article122593759.html

Thankfully the courts are stepping in, but how did it even get to this point?

There needs to be more Bernie Sanderses in the DNC, who can passionately and simply push out a message.

12/23/2016 10:50:24 AM

aaronburro
Sup, B
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I can't take an opinion column seriously which says to drop the hyperbole and then goes on the say that NC isn't a democracy. There are some serious issues here in the state, but not being a democracy isn't one of them.

^^ yup, it is bizarro world. Expect more of the same from the Dems against Trump that you saw from the 'Pubs against Obama.

12/23/2016 10:58:26 AM

moron
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^ they make a good case for the statement. And it's not that we're not a democracy, we're a very low grade democracy, and perhaps the worst in the country.

12/23/2016 11:38:51 AM

dtownral
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its not a very good argument though outside of the gerrymandering, and a court ruled on those

[Edited on December 23, 2016 at 12:08 PM. Reason : .]

12/23/2016 12:05:40 PM

aaronburro
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^^ I thought some of their measures were interesting. But it's jumping the shark to say that we're not a democracy. I also thought their gripes about getting "0 percent of legislative power" are sour grapes. The author had no problem when the tables were turned and Democrats were running the show in NC, with almost un-losable state legislative districts. He then complains about gerrymandering, but probably was OK with it prior to 2010, when Democrats were doing it. And the part about identities? Fuck off. You lost on an issue, get over it. The whole piece is basically "we're not getting our way any more, so NC isn't a democracy." And people wonder why the Democrats are losing elections these days.

12/23/2016 1:06:02 PM

kdogg(c)
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Quote :
"They’re all the people I grew up with. They’re their kids. And they’re not racist. They’re not sexist. But we didn’t talk to them.
— Joe Biden, vice president
"


http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-biden-interview-20161222-story.html

Quote :
"As Democrats ponder their future, Joe Biden makes a plea for a focus on the middle class

Over a career in elected public office lasting more than 46 years, Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. has seen campaigns from the rudimentary, family-run effort that first launched him unexpectedly to the U.S. Senate as a 29-year-old to the sophisticated, data-driven juggernaut that helped elect him and Barack Obama twice to the nation’s highest offices.

But rarely has he trusted anything as much as his own gut instinct, attuned to the middle- and working-class sensibilities of his former neighbors in towns like Scranton, Pa., and Claymont, Del.

And so as he sat in his office one day in October and watched footage of a Donald Trump rally in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., not far from his childhood home, Biden sensed trouble.

“Son of a gun. We may lose this election,” Biden said, recalling his reaction during an interview in his West Wing office.

“They’re all the people I grew up with. They’re their kids. And they’re not racist. They’re not sexist. But we didn’t talk to them.”

Now, as the Democratic Party struggles to understand what went wrong in an election that left them with the least power in state and federal offices in decades, that same instinct leads Biden to offer a diagnosis and a prescription for what he sees as a more successful approach, one which pushes back, if ever-so-gently, against a powerful current in Democratic politics.

It begins, in typical Biden fashion, with a reference to family wisdom.

“My dad used to have an expression. He said, ‘I don’t expect the government to solve my problems. But I expect them to understand it,” Biden said.

“I believe that we were not letting an awful lot of people — high school-educated, mostly Caucasian, but also people of color — know that we understood their problems.”

There’s “a bit of elitism that’s crept in” to party thinking, he worries, setting up what he sees as the false impression that progressive values are inconsistent with working-class values.

“What are the arguments we’re hearing? ‘Well, we’ve got to be more progressive.’ I’m not saying we should be less progressive,” he said, adding that he would “stack my progressive credentials against anyone” in the party.

“We should be proud of where the hell we are, and not yield an inch. But,” he added, “in the meantime, you can’t eat equality. You know?”

He also distinguishes what he describes as the middle-class agenda that President Obama has put forth from the more populist, anti-Wall Street message that helped power Bernie Sanders’ rise in the Democratic primary.

“I like Bernie,” Biden said, adding he agrees with the Vermont senator on many issues. “But I don’t think 500 billionaires caused all our problems.”

It was election eve, and Biden had just concluded the last of 83 campaign events he would headline on Hillary Clinton’s behalf. Something once again didn’t feel right.

Stepping off the stage after an at-times sentimental appearance in northern Virginia with Sen. Tim Kaine, the man he hoped would succeed him, the vice president shared a nagging concern with aides: Any enthusiasm among the crowd of several thousand was not about the party’s presidential nominee.

“You didn’t see any Hillary signs,” Biden recalled. “Every time I talked about Hillary they listened. But …”

Biden’s speech that night mirrors his message to Democrats now.

“God willing we’re going to win this, but there’s a lot of people who are going to vote for Donald Trump,” Biden told the crowd. “We’ve got to figure out why. What is eating at them? Some of it will be unacceptable. But some of it will be about hard truths about our country and about our economy. A lot of people do feel left out.”

Speaking weeks later beside a crackling fireplace in his West Wing office, Biden was more blunt.

“I was trying to be as tactful as I could in making it clear that I thought we constantly made a mistake of not speaking to the fears, aspirations, concerns of middle class people,” he said.

In the campaign, “you didn’t hear a word about that husband and wife working, making 100,000 bucks a year, two kids, struggling and scared to death. They used to be our constituency.”

When Biden considered running himself in 2016, he and his aides envisioned a campaign that would combine the continued popularity of the Obama administration in which he’d served with his reputation as a middle class warrior and his affable — often blunt — persona.

In a memo to Biden’s vast network of former staff and supporters, a top aide wrote that a Biden campaign would be “optimistic,” a “campaign from the heart” — and, naturally, “it won’t be a scripted affair.”

If Biden entered the race, former Sen. Ted Kaufman wrote in the memo, which quickly became public, it would be because of “his burning conviction that we need to fundamentally change the balance in our economy and the political structure to restore the ability of the middle class to get ahead.”

Biden, of course, did not run. The emotional toll of the death that spring of his eldest son, Beau, made a campaign an impossibility.

But the clarity of Kaufman’s memo contrasts notably with Biden’s critique of Clinton’s campaign. In the interview, Biden pointed to questions that came even from members of Clinton’s inner circle, revealed in emails made public by WikiLeaks, about whether the Democratic front-runner had figured out why she was running.

“I don’t think she ever really figured it out,” Biden said. “And by the way, I think it was really hard for her to decide to run.”

Clinton’s decision to run did not reflect raw ambition or a desire to move back to the White House, he said, calling those characterizations of her unfair. Instead, he said, he saw her decision to run as ultimately stemming from a sense of duty and her belief that her victory “would have opened up a whole range of new vistas to women” in a similar way that Obama’s had for African Americans.

“She thought she had no choice but to run. That, as the first woman who had an opportunity to win the presidency, I think it was a real burden on her,” he said.

It was one of several times Biden went out of his way to emphasize that he doesn’t see Clinton as singularly responsible for the November defeat. It was, rather, the result of a combination of factors that includes the unique candidacy of the president-elect.

The core of the Democratic agenda is popular with the American people, Biden said, but was not always communicated effectively to those who would benefit from it.

As he said during the campaign, Biden became frustrated with coverage of the race that seemed devoid of substance, based more on documenting an unending series of controversial public statements from Trump that “sucked all the oxygen” that should have been devoted to issues.

Asked about comparisons between his and Trump’s freewheeling rhetorical style and economic message, Biden seemed cautious to avoid directly criticizing the president-elect.

“I think there’s a difference between authenticity and …,” he said before pausing to choose his words carefully. “I don’t think I’ve ever said anything that I didn’t believe. Now maybe I shouldn’t have said it. But I believed it.”

What he more clearly disputes is the notion that Trump was any more successful than Clinton in offering both empathy and hope to economically distressed Americans.

“I don’t think he understands working-class or middle-class people,” Biden said. “He at least acknowledged the pain. But he played to the prejudice. He played to the fear. He played to the desperation. There was nothing positive that I ascertained when he spoke to these folks that was uplifting.”

::

The party’s defeat leaves the Democrats without a clear leader. But Biden says he’s not going anywhere, which he means literally and figuratively. Like Obama, he is planning to live in Washington, at least part time, after moving out of the vice president’s residence on Jan. 20.

The presence of both the former president and the former vice president in the capital will be historically unusual. But Biden’s decision to remain nearby is, like many he’s made in his political career, largely driven by family. His wife, for one, will continue teaching at a community college in Virginia.

Still, the decision to live even part time in the nation’s capital will give him proximity to the unfolding Trump administration and the decision-makers and media figures interacting with it.

And it will allow him to continue stoking the political fires — he seems to revel in the notion that he might be fit enough to challenge Trump in four years, when he would be 77 and Trump 74, although he has not publicly committed to any plans.

Others close to him are less reticent. “Biden’s going to be the country’s conscience," said Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the former chair of the Democratic National Committee who forged a close relationship with him.

Biden will be freer to speak out about Trump administration actions than Obama, Wasserman Schultz said. "And he’s certainly not shy.""


Autopsy over.

We'll see if any other Democrats listen.

LOL....riiiiiiight

12/23/2016 3:15:12 PM

moron
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https://theintercept.com/2017/01/12/cory-booker-joins-senate-republicans-to-kill-measure-to-import-cheaper-medicine-from-canada/

Credibility -10

The pharma industry needs the politicians more than the other way around, they're too obsequious to the lobbyists here.

1/12/2017 6:16:14 PM

NeuseRvrRat
pwease no steppy
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it'll be good to have the anti-war democrats back

1/15/2017 5:54:00 PM

Kurtis636
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It will. Too bad the outgoing president set a precident that congressional involvement in military action isn't needed since they once authorized military force in the past. It's one of the scariest things Obama did in his presidency.

1/15/2017 6:14:02 PM

NyM410
J-E-T-S
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When was the last time any party was anti-war? 20s?

1/15/2017 6:40:09 PM

Kurtis636
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It's been about 60-70 years. Roosevelt needed Pearl Harbor to get us into ww2. I think the case could be made that the Republicans under Eisenhower were antiwar.

1/15/2017 6:45:54 PM

dtownral
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is anyone a member who could post this?
https://politicalwire.com/2017/01/23/will-rural-voters-swing-back/

i'm curious to read it, but not $5 curious

1/23/2017 4:10:17 PM

kdogg(c)
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http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2017/01/24/dnc_chair_candidate_my_job_is_to_tell_white_people_when_to_shut_their_mouths.html

Please choose her!

LOL

1/24/2017 7:14:29 PM

JCE2011
All American
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That would be perfect... please god double down on collectivist identity politicss, you fucking morons

1/24/2017 8:01:49 PM

kdogg(c)
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so transgender people are upset with the women's march because it wasn't inclusive enough

and black lives matter are upset with the women's march because it wasn't inclusive enough

Trump is going to keep MAGA while the left continues to cannibalize itself

that's what happens when the left abandons it's old core (workers and unions) for identity politics

1/25/2017 10:42:01 PM

NyM410
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^^^^ ignoring the riff raff in this thread would you agree things like this weekend will only further alienate the rural and working class from the party?

1/29/2017 8:17:27 PM

dtownral
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Yes, this is a tough message to sell to middle America. In fact I would think that this was a strategic action to solidify that divide except that I'm not sure the response was that predictable; I'm a little surprised myself that this was the issue that brought people to the streets.

The predominant themes I've seen from protests are we welcome you, or Islam is peace or similar -- those are failed messages that should be dropped. You can't win with identify politics. This ban needs to spun to show how it is playing into the hands of Islamists, everyone needs to be hammering how this breeds domestic terrorism and how this is what terrorists want. Or something else, I'm not sure, but not identity politics, those have been losing offices for over a decade.

1/29/2017 8:38:01 PM

TerdFerguson
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There may be some Trump voters capable of being reached on this issue. I wonder if appealing to "a nation of immigrants" type sympathy for the refugees might play better.

But, there is a significant portion of Trump supporters that LITERALLY believe ISIS is sneaking in thousands of covert agents who will just be biding their time until they are given the go ahead to attack. You aren't going to convince these people of anything, they only see the "enemy." Sometimes you have to do what is moral and let the politics fall where they may.

[Edited on January 30, 2017 at 8:20 AM. Reason : Perhaps arguing a Muslim ban is an ISIS recruiting tool ala McCain and Graham will be effective?]

1/30/2017 8:19:23 AM

bbehe
#TeamGyro
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The Cato Institute, of all places, said that allowing muslims in was keeping America secure and reducing extremism.

1/30/2017 8:30:19 AM

NyM410
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Just so I'm clear, I think it is a very important issue and one worthy of championing. But I also realize it's easy for me to say that when I know where my next meal and mortgage payment is coming from.

My point was simply when those are issues (and they aren't for the average Trump voter but they are for the average Democrat-turned-Trump voter) you really won't care if "group Y" is discriminated against. It's all about self-preservation. If the party can't get that back they will never be able to fight this kind of thing.

Quote :
"But, there is a significant portion of Trump supporters that LITERALLY believe ISIS is sneaking in thousands of covert agents who will just be biding their time until they are given the go ahead to attack"


Those people are lost causes and fuck them anyway. I'm talking about the voting bloc that was lost. Not those who were never there to start with.

[Edited on January 30, 2017 at 8:46 AM. Reason : X]

1/30/2017 8:45:33 AM

JCE2011
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Quote :
"Sometimes you have to do what is moral and let the politics fall where they may."


I guess it is easy to be "moral" when you use other people's money to virtue signal, and are importing what will amount to generations of poor, dependent voters.

1/30/2017 8:56:51 AM

rjrumfel
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But do we honestly think that those rust-belt voters that the Democrat party lost are really going to get the jobs they have in their head? The days of assembly line jobs paying $30 an hour are gone, and you can probably thank labor unions for that.

But when their jobs don't come, they're going to blame Trump, and the next election cycle it will be back to business as usual. It's all about limiting the damage right now.

1/30/2017 8:58:47 AM

kdogg(c)
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POTUS is running circles around the Dems/media and they have no thought-out response.

Hence, Chuck Schumer cries.

1/30/2017 11:59:11 PM

NyM410
J-E-T-S
47106 Posts
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Oh my God. Is that a serious post? Running circles around them?

If he had them rounded up and systematically slaughtered I'm sure you'd say the same.

1/31/2017 5:59:34 AM

JCE2011
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I like how the left has no problem with the entirety of the MSM being in bed with the corrupt DNC, essentially serving as leftist propaganda 24/7.

Yet when a republican fights back, it's suddenly 1984 and the Press are the "victims"

1/31/2017 9:25:59 AM

Exiled
Eyes up here ^^
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TIL that Fox News is in bed with the DNC.

1/31/2017 9:35:43 AM

TerdFerguson
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The executive chair of Buttbart is LITERALLY holding little Donnie's hand while he signs EOs and Trump is LITERALLY tweeting what he just saw on FNC segments, but its the DNC that has a problem.

1/31/2017 9:42:42 AM

JCE2011
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And where does Breitbart pretend to be an "objective" source of news?

The right desperately needs Breitbart to counter 10 equivalent HuffingtonPost-tier leftist sites.

In case you missed the election, it was literally Breitbart and some of Fox News for Trump, and every other media outlet 100% for Clinton.

1/31/2017 9:58:07 AM

dtownral
All American
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i'm not even mad, that's impressive spin

1/31/2017 10:10:41 AM

TerdFerguson
All American
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^^you forgot InfoWars and Stormfront, they were both for Trump too.

[Edited on January 31, 2017 at 10:12 AM. Reason : Seems like I remember a ton of "MSM" spending countless front page headlines on "emails"]

1/31/2017 10:11:10 AM

Exiled
Eyes up here ^^
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Don't forget Wikileaks too

1/31/2017 10:12:23 AM

JCE2011
All American
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List them all out and compare, it isn't even close. The left has overwhelming control in all media except talk radio.

The most damaging ones are the major cable news outlets that the average American assumes are trust worthy. The ones that pretend to be objective and then get caught being in bed with the DNC...

Quote :
"Don't forget Wikileaks too"


Apparently you've forgotten WikiLeaks if we are even having this discussion. The corrupt DNC/Media collusion was scary this election cycle. Complaining about Trump fighting back against it is hilarious though

1/31/2017 10:21:15 AM

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